Photoshop Tutorial – Hollywood Magic Retouching

Hollywood Movie Retouching

Photoshop 911 calls are numerous wanting to know how to remove blemishes from photos, give skin the fashion magazine look, or just how to get that certain glamorous fashion look. Well, when so many people wanted the same advice we went straight to the source — The Glitter Guru! We forwarded Suzette’s directions to all those readers, and now present the full piece complete with pictures…

Beauty Retouching

By Suzette Troche-Stapp a.k.a. the glitterguru

I take a slightly different approach to retouching beauty. People I have taught in the past have found it difficult to distinguish where to start with the clone tool when retouching someone’s face.

glamour_1.jpg

Step 1:
I came up with a different way of seeing the imperfections, which should help you think differently about the process of retouching. It allows you to ignore color momentarily and concentrate on shading, similar to the old Hollywood black and white style of portrait retouching.

First open an image of a person, preferably female. Then choose windows –documents– new window. You will now have two versions of the same file on screen.

glamour_2.jpg

Step 2:
Choose the document on the right.

Go to your channels palette and turn off the eyeball on the red and blue channels so that you are only viewing the green.

Most of the skin imperfections on light to medium colored skin will show up in this channel and you will be able to see these imperfections more clearly by just viewing the green channel on its own.

glamour_3.jpg

Step 3:
Create a new layer called “retouch”.

Begin with a large clone stamp at around 20%-25% and begin to smooth the skin. Use the color version on the left to monitor your work as you go along, and to make sure you are getting the desired result.
I tend to be quite heavy at this point and really remove all texture.

glamour_4.jpg

 Step 4:
Once I have a smooth even skin tone, then I close the b&w version and go to the retouching layer and reduce the opacity.

It really depends on the image but I average around 50% opacity. This allows some of the texture of the skin to come back through.

Here is the original file and the final “point-of purchase” created for the client.

Good Luck and glitter, glitter everywhere!

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